Call for papers

CALL FOR PAPERS

The 10th International Conference on Corporate Social Responsibility

18 – 20 May 2011, Loyola University New Orleans, USA

Stream

Sensemaking and Corporate Social Responsibility: individual and social contextual developments

Deadline for Submission: All papers and abstracts should be sent by 10th January 2011 by email to davideacrowther@aol.com; creis@newhaven.edu; anthony.yue@msvu.ca

Stream Convenors: Christina Reis and Anthony R. Yue

Making sense of corporate social responsibility reflects subjective judgments made by groups of observers. Karl Weick (1995) sees sensemaking as a process in which everyone engages in normal life and from which people develop a set of ideas with explanatory possibilities.  This sensemaking arises from contextualized actions and is grounded in identity work. The sensemaking of corporate social responsibility (CSR) aims to understand how employees come to believe, indeed to act upon, what is important for business and consequently improves our understanding about their interpretations and actions of CSR. However, in previous research these relationships are often largely acontextual, focusing exclusively on decision making and neglecting the role of various contextual aspects such as culture, gender, ethnicity, class or social background. We would argue there is a lack of contextual research on the relationship of sensemaking and CSR. Our aim in this stream is to extend traditional notions of the importance of the sensemaking and CSR by giving attention to issues of individual and social identities. At the same time the individual and the social is contextualized within attachments to cultural, communities and organizations. Thus we seek to foster an individual and social contextualised consideration of the concept of sensemaking and CSR.

Issues may include but are not confined to the following themes. In particular we seek papers which address the following themes and issues:

Individual orientations of professionals in different contexts. We are interested in papers that consider how professionals identify social responsibility content in their daily work. Reis (2010) examined how some managers were more proactive than others in identifying ethical content in unexpected situations. This theme seeks to extend our understanding of corporate professional orientations in various contexts or how they make sense of social responsibility in their daily work/lives.

Identity, choice and existential being. To consider individual choice within the context of ethical behavior and CSR broaches fundamental questions of how we act in good or  bad, faith (Sartre, 1957) and notions of personal authenticity (Yue, 2009a; 2009b).  Emerging work concerning sensemaking and identity in existential terms (Yue & Mills, 2008) might usefully be extended into the CSR field, offering more in-depth contextualization of the “enactive of sensible environments” aspect of sensemaking (Weick,1995) in CSR terms.

Reflecting on sensemaking and CRS. We propose a general theme focusing on the role of various contextual aspects such as culture, gender, ethnicity, embodied aesthetics, class or social background. We embrace papers with examples, case-studies and papers arguing of how theories related to these topics contribute to the study of sensemaking and CSR.

We therefore welcome both conceptual and empirical papers that develop these approaches toward understanding Sensemaking and CSR and insights on how Sensemaking and CSR relationship might apply in various contexts.

Submission Instructions: Although preference will be given to full papers, abstracts of 200-500 words will also be considered. All papers and abstracts should be sent by 10th January 2011 by email to davideacrowther@aol.com; creis@newhaven.edu; anthony.yue@msvu.ca

Stream Convenors:

Christina Reis

Christina Reis, Ph.D. is Assistant Professor in management at the University of New Haven in Connecticut. She worked as management trainer for a European multinational company where she gained knowledge and experience on international management and managers’ work. She has taught in Canada, Germany, Austria, Finland, Portugal and the USA. Her research covers global careers, ethics, gender and female entrepreneurship.

Anthony R. Yue

Anthony is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication Studies at Mount Saint Vincent University in Halifax, Nova Scotia and came to academic life after an extensive career working in a variety of entrepreneurial organizations. He is broadly interested in how individuals navigate their organized world.  His research spans diverse areas such as gossip and storytelling in organizations, occupational health and safety issues, disability and workers, and existentialist thought.  Anthony teaches in the areas of public relations, management, ethics and research methods

References

Reis, C. (2010), Sensemaking of managers’ ethical work orientations, Social Responsibility Journal, Vol.6 No.1, pp. 143-155

Sartre, J.P. (1957) Being and Nothingness: An Essay on Phenomenological Ontology. New York, NY: Philosophical Library.

Weick, K. E. (1995), Sensemaking in organizations, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Yue, A.R. (2009a). “Existentialism” in Mills, A.J., Durepos, G., & Wiebe, E. (Eds). The Sage Encyclopedia of Case Studies. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Yue, A.R. (2009b). “Authenticity and Bad Faith (Sartre)” in Mills, A.J., Durepos, G., & Wiebe, E. (Eds). The Sage Encyclopedia of Case Studies. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Yue, A. R. & Mills, A. J. (2008). Making sense out of bad faith: Sartre, Weick and existential sensemaking in organizational analysis. Tamara 7(1).

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